Frequently Asked Questions

How much paper and ink are used to print the magazine?

Is the magazine printed in Washington, D.C.?

How is NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC sent to members?

What does the research staff do?

How do you choose which articles to publish?

Are internships available at NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC?

Does the Society or the magazine have offices around the world?

When will you again publish the works of Robert Kincaid—the photographer in The Bridges of Madison County?

How can I go on a NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC expedition?


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How much paper and ink are used to print the magazine?

It takes eight million pounds of paper and 649,000 pounds of ink to print nine million issues of the magazine each month.

Is the magazine printed in Washington, D.C.?

No, in Corinth, Mississippi. The two gravure presses there are 157 feet long—about the width of a football field—and each weighs 390 tons. Three offset presses are 110 feet long and each weighs 86 tons.

How is NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC sent to members?

By second-class nonprofit mail. An estimated six percent of such mail in the U.S. is generated by the magazine.

What does the research staff do?

Researchers verify all information that appears in our magazine, and help ensure its fairness and objectivity. Usually one researcher is assigned to a magazine article, and has about four to six weeks to complete the task. He or she consults countless published and online sources, contacts as many as 70 or 80 people and organizations mentioned or photographed, as well as other experts throughout the world. We take great pride in knowing that nothing appears in the magazine without being checked for accuracy and balance.

How do you choose which articles to publish?

Senior editors and department heads meet each month to consider ideas and proposals from outside contributers and staff members. They discuss each idea in several contexts: Will it be interesting to our readers? Does it duplicate other material we are preparing, or have recently published? Why should we do this story now? The GEOGRAPHIC is a magazine of discovery, and timing is crucial; an article should be relevant to current events or scientific advancement.

Are internships available at NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC?

We have a GEOGRAPHIC internship designed for geography and cartography majors enrolled in their junior or senior year of college or in a master’s program. Information about this internship, which accommodates several students during the year, is sent late each summer to heads of geography departments at colleges and universities throughout the United States. They are asked to encourage only their strongest students to apply.

We provide a summer internship in Journalism each year for one college student selected by the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME). This student is one of 40 placed by ASME with magazines throughout the country. An ASME intern must be in his or her junior year, be starting a full senior year the following fall, and have demonstrated a commitment to journalism as a profession. Announcements about the program are available at college English or journalism departments. They can also be obtained from the American Society of Magazine Editors, 575 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York 10022; telephone 1 212 752 0055.

Does the Society or the magazine have offices around the world?

We have no editorial bureaus. Branches of our advertising and business functions are in New York, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, London, Paris, and at our printing plant in Corinth, Mississippi. We also publish a Japanese language edition of NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, with headquarters in Tokyo.

When will you again publish the works of Robert Kincaid—the photographer in The Bridges of Madison County?

Alas, the sexy, middle-aged photographer, portrayed by Clint Eastwood in the film that followed the book, is pure fiction. There is not, and never was, a Robert Kincaid here, although some of our photographers have shamelessly encouraged the comparison.

How can I go on a NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC expedition?

Sorry. We cannot offer that. The magazine may send a writer or photographer to record an expedition, but it does not usually organize it. The Society, as distinct from the magazine, awards grants to qualified scientists, who are usually associated with universities or scientific institutions. Their research projects may include expeditions, but most grant recipients prefer to select their own team members, often graduate students familiar with their work.

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